No Infractions Yet for City and County K2 Bans

By Megan Trent

September 13, 2010 Updated Sep 13, 2010 at 5:59 PM EST

ALLEN COUNTY, Ind. (Indiana's NewsCenter) - In nearly three weeks of visiting businesses that once sold the synthetic drug K2, Fort Wayne police say they haven't written a single citation for the sale or possession of the marijuana-like substance.

The county-wide ordinance went into effect Friday, but so far no K2 infractions there either.

However, unlike their Fort Wayne colleagues, county officers do not write citations. Instead, they document any cases they are told about or discover. They then turn it over to the county attorney.

While enforcement and lack of testing continue to be a challenge, police say so far the ban has been "fairly" successful.

"Business owners are being very cooperative," says Fort Wayne Police Department Public Information Officer Raquel Foster. "We have had, through our Vice and Narcotics Divisions, uniformed officers going into these establishments in search of k2. We have not found any on the shelves."

Allen County Sheriff Ken Fries says that doesn't mean it's not being sold. "I have no doubt that the people who were were selling it in plain view have taken it out of plain view. I won't say that they've quit selling it, but they've certainly taken it out of plain view."

Sheriff Fries says K2 began to take the place of marijuana because it was legal, but now he expects it to be forced underground like other illegal drugs.




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