Winter Weather Causes Roof And Structural Damage

By Madeline Shine- 21Alive

February 21, 2014 Updated Feb 21, 2014 at 6:13 PM EDT

FORT WAYNE, Ind. (21 Alive) -- There's only so much pressure a building can withstand from winter’s heavy weight before it causes serious structure damage.

This winter we've seen snow and ice pile high on the ground as well as the roofs of homes and businesses.

In just one week our viewing area has reported on two roof collapses, both due to the weight of ice and snow.

A flat roof is far more likely to have structural issues.

Every building is designed to withstand the elements, but the longer the snow settles, the chance of structural damage goes up.

Being aware of the amount of snow and ice on a building is important in order to prevent a potential problem.

“Around your house you can keep an eye out for what's happening there. If you see large icicles hanging off the side, get them off of there. Get them off now, that's a lot of weight hanging there so, just a little caution, know what's going on,” Dekalb County Building Commissioner Bill Waters said.

“You don't have to inspect the buildings you just have to be aware of what's going on around you. Everybody listens to weather forecasts and predicts the next day and whatever the situation is on the weather. They should be paying close attention to that if you're a building owner. You can pretty much tell what's going to happen to your building.”

As the weather begins to warm up make sure to check around where the ice is melting, especially if you have a flat roof.




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