Huntington Teen Battles Cancer

By Stephanie Parkinson

April 17, 2012 Updated Apr 19, 2012 at 3:45 PM EST

HUNTINGTON, Ind. (Indiana's NewsCenter) - January 16th, it's a day one Huntington high schooler will never forget. It was the day he found out he had cancer.

"I just thought, well...I'm gonna die from this," said Cade Abbett, cancer patient.

Cade Abbett is a sophomore at Huntington North High School and a victim of cancer.

"It is a helpless feeling, he is completely in their hands, there is nothing I can do to fix him,” said Carrie Abbett, Cade’s mother.

When Cade was diagnosed he had tumors in his legs, throughout his back and in his pelvis. He's been undergoing chemotherapy. Now many of the tumors are gone and the largest tumor shrunk by 40 percent.

"To hear the doctors say that this is the best case that we could be in, it really is mind-blowing to me ‘cause they said how bad it was at the beginning, but now it's amazing to me. And I know I'm gonna keep fighting, I'm gonna beat this,” said Cade Abbett.

The work isn't over for Cade and his mom. He starts radiation next week in Bloomington, and is contusing chemo in Indianapolis. Cade's battle also meant a huge life change for his mother.

"I could not continue working, because someone has to have him there for all of those appointments, so him and I are just together 24-7 now, I'm a fulltime mom,” said Carrie Abbett.

As they travel all over the state for his treatments his mom says there is one thing that gets him through.

"The minute we get in the car, he plugs the iPad into my car and we jam the entire drive, and that is what we do. Music lifts his sprits. And it just puts him in a good mood for the whole chemo week,” said Carrie Abbett.

His mom says she's even tuning into his hobby.

"I've learned all of his songs, I think I can sing them all by heart now,” said Carrie Abbett.

Another way Cade is keeping positive is by focusing on his goals. After high school, he plans to go to Taylor University and pursue a career in writing.

"My dream job is to be an author, and to see my book on a shelf somewhere. I've been writing poetry for quite a bit and that really seems to pass the time, I've been writing a journal and just to keep that and look back on day one and look at now and it's really just like, wow,” said Cade Abbett.

With the treatments Cade is not able to go to school anymore. But his classmates and a former teacher are working hard to show him they are there to support him.

"He always had a special place in my heart. He was always a leader in class. And when I found out about his situation I wanted to do something about it,” said Amy Ehinger, Cade’s teacher.

Mrs. Ehinger’s class is hosting a 5K’abe. It's a 5K run to raise money and support Cade.

"Our class just collectively came together and thought it would be a great idea because this was already a project we had so we thought if we had someone to do it for then it would just be that much cooler,” said Molly Bickel, Cade's classmate.

Cade's mother says it's not just his school reaching out to them.

"The community in general, we have received so much. Different fundraisers that are happening or just anonymously things in the mail from gas cards to gift cards, food cards, that I think really showed him, he's not in this alone,” said Carrie Abbett.

His classmates also raised $800 at a school dance to help him with his medical bills. Cade hopes once he's cancer free he can be back in school and back with his friends.

For more information on the 5K click the link at the bottom of this page.




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