Local Reaction to Bhutto's Assassination

By Corinne Rose

June 18, 2010 Updated Dec 28, 2007 at 7:14 PM EST

You might not know that the person behind the voice of our daily traffic reports on Indiana's NewsCenter every weekday, was born in Pakistan.

Our regular viewers of Indiana's NewsCenter at five certainly know WOWO Radio's Aishah Hasnie.

She was born in Pakistan and came to the United States with her family when she was six. Some of her father's -- and most of her mother's -- family are still in Pakistan.

And the erupting violence over Benazir Bhutto's assassination is making life difficult for Hasnie's family. She wasn't able to reach them by phone for several days, but says they're okay, even in the city where Bhutto was killed.

WOWO's Aishah Hasnie\Pakistani Native: " Everybody is taking precautions. No one is going out if they don't need to. My uncle was just telling my mother that there was a wedding in our family that was supposed to happen this week in downtown Raulbindi, which obviously has been postponed."

Hasnie says it's traditional for muslims to observe three days of mourning for someone who's died. And since Bhutto's a national figure, the entire country is observing the tradition.

Benazir Bhutto was prime minister in the 1980's, her father was prime minister and he and his sons were killed.

Hasnie likens the Bhutto family to our Kennedys, Clintons or Bushes here in the States. Powerful, but sometimes controversial political families.




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