Postal Service Steps Closer to Eliminating Next-Day Delivery

By Scott Sarvay
By Rachel Martin

December 5, 2011 Updated Dec 5, 2011 at 9:06 PM EST

WASHINGTON (Indiana’s NewsCenter) - The cash-strapped U.S. Postal Service announced that it will reduce its operating costs by $20-billion by 2015.

The United States Postal Service (USPS) will slow its First-Class delivery next Spring and, for the first time in 40 years, eliminate the chance for stamped letters to arrive the next day. First-class deliveries would then take up to three days instead of one or two.

Another proposed change is the elimination of Saturday mail, and even the elimation of several small-town post offices nation wide. In Sept., USPS began studying 252 out of 487 post offices for possible closures.

The estimated $3 billion in reductions are part of a wide-ranging effort by the postal service to trim costs and avert bankruptcy. With many people using e-mail and paying their bills online, USPS is not making much of a profit. In fact, USPS lost $5.1 billion this past year.

The changes could slow everything from check payments to receipt of Netflix's DVD's by-mail, add costs to mail-order prescription drugs, and threaten the existence of newspapers and time- sensitive magazines delivered by postal carrier to suburban and rural communities.

The Postal Service announced Monday, it will be sending a request to the Postal Regulatory Commission for their opinon on the proposals. USPS will then solicit comments from the public regarding the proposed changes.




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